center for advaced imaging   http://www.uni-magdeburg.de/ http://www.med.uni-magdeburg.de/ http://www.ifn-magdeburg.de/index.jsp http://www.ifh.uni-bremen.de/eindex.html
CENTER FOR ADVANCED IMAGING
 
 

Introduction

The Center for Advanced Imaging (CAI) was established in 2002 as an integrated neuroscientific research center for the Department of Neurology at Otto-von-Guericke University in Magdeburg (the coordinating institution), the Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology in Magdeburg, the Center for Neurosciences (ZeN) in Bremen, and the Hanse Institute for Advanced Study in Delmenhorst. In 2002, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) selected the CAI as one of five outstanding regional imaging centers to be designated a “Center of Excellence.” Since then, the CAI has been a major recipient of government funding. The CAI and its affiliate organizations focus on the integration of the results of human and animal experimental procedures, and on the application of multimodal imaging in the various areas of cognitive neuroscience. An additional shared goal is the development of new neuroimaging and visualization techniques. Thanks to the support of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research and the States of Saxony-Anhalt and Bremen, the CAI has extensive brain-imaging laboratories at its disposal. These laboratories are equipped with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) units for the functional and spectroscopic examination of human subjects (1.5 T, 3x3T, 7T), animals, and tissues (2x4.7T, 2x8.4T, 14.1T). It also has a whole-head MEG apparatus with an integrated EEG (248/96 channels). A dedicated team of engineers and scientists oversees the operation of the equipment. A central data maintenance and analysis unit supports the evaluation and archiving of the experimental data. The CAI concentrates on investigations of the control of higher brain functions in the following three areas: visual and auditory perception, memory, and decision-making and activity control. The comparison of human subject and animal experimental results allows for an enhanced understanding of brain imaging outcomes. An additional central objective of the CAI is to support the training of young scientists. In Magdeburg and Bremen, the members of the CAI coordinate the curricula of various neurobiology, cognitive neuroscience, and psychology programs. The "Leibniz Program for Cognitive Neuroscience" (Coordinator: Professor Dr. H-J. Heinze) oversees the recruitment and training of outstanding young scientists. It is supported by both the CAI and the Berlin NeuroImaging Center (BNIC, Coordinator: Prof.Dr. A.Villringer).
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